Skip to content

Basic Emergency Medical Technician Program

Overview

The Emergency Medical Services Program at Lansing Community College offers a Basic Emergency Medical Technician Program. LCC's program results in a well-educated Basic EMT, providing education beyond the Basic EMT minimum requirements. The program can be taken in two different configurations. Click on the Advising Guide to see the options available for completing the program.

The Emergency Medical Service Program is accredited by:

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) upon recommendation of the Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for Emergency Medical Services Professions (CoAEMSP) located at:

1361 Park Street
Clearwater, Florida 33756
They can be contacted at (727) 210-2350 or at www.caahep.org.

Click here to view Advising Guide

The student must complete an ICHAT Criminal Background Investigation through www.michigan.gov/ichat and submit documentation from ICHAT to the EMS office before beginning the clinical course, EMTA 112. The EMS office is located in the Health and Human Services Building, Room 108. All records showing on a background check will be sent to the LCC Risk Management Office for acceptance into the program. Meeting the deadline for a refund is the student's responsibility.

Other Related Courses

For those students interested in obtaining an Associate Degree in EMS or for those that have special interest in specific components of EMS, the following courses are available.

  • EMTA 105 - Ambulance Driving
  • EMTA 114 - Rescue/Extrication/Dangerous Situations
  • SPCH 110 - Oral Communication in the Workplace
  • WRIT 124 - Technical Writing or WRIT 127 - Business Writing
  • *BIOL 145 - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology - OR -
  • *BIOL 201- Human Anatomy and BIOL 202 - Human Physiology

*BIOL 145 or BIOL 201 and BIOL 202 are required as a prerequisite for admission to the Paramedic Program. BIOL 201 and BIOL 202 can be taken concurrently.

These courses may be taken concurrently with the Basic EMT Program courses (EMTA 101,102,103,104 and 112). Students interested in obtaining an associate degree must complete CORE curriculum requirements in addition to the above courses and the Paramedic Program.

Students are required to purchase some medical supplies, appropriate clinical attire and update their immunizations, including the Hepatitis B series. These costs are in addition to regular course fees.

State licensing is performed through the Division of Emergency Medical Services of the State of Michigan Department of Community Health, EMS Division. A written and practical examination offered by the National Registry of EMT's must be taken for licensure.

Continuing Education Information - Click Here

Basic Emergency Medical Technician Career Facts

Nature of Work

Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) typically are dispatched to the scene of an incident by a 911 operator and often with or are themselves police and/or fire officers. Once they arrive, they determine the nature and extent of the patient's condition and try to ascertain whether the patient has preexisting medical problems. Following strict rules and guidelines, they give appropriate emergency care and, when necessary, transport the patient. Emergency treatments for more complicated problems are carried out under the direction of physicians by radio preceding or during transport. The EMT is trained to care for patients on accident scenes and on transport by ambulance to the hospital under medical directions. The EMT has the emergency skills to assess a patient's condition and manage respiratory, cardiac, trauma and many medical emergencies.

Most career EMTs work in metropolitan areas. There are many more volunteer EMTs in smaller cities, towns, and rural areas. They volunteer for fire departments, emergency medical services, or hospitals and may respond to only a few calls for service per month, or may answer the majority of calls, especially in smaller communities.

Employment Prospects

Employment of emergency medical technicians and paramedics is expected to grow 20-35 percent through 2018. Population growth and urbanization will increase the demand for full-time paid EMTs rather than for volunteers. In addition, a large segment of the population, the aging baby boomers, will further spur demand for EMT services, as they become more likely to have medical emergencies.

To practice in the State of Michigan, individuals must pass the written practical exam prescribed by the National Registry of EMTs. Upon completion individuals then apply for a Michigan EMS License through the Michigan Department of Community Health, EMS Division. The license must be renewed every three years.

Skills You Need

EMTs and paramedics are required to have physical and emotional strength and stamina, as well as skills in interpersonal relationships and effective communication and critical thinking. Students must have a high school diploma or GED and complete the educational requirements set forth by the Michigan Department of Consumer and Industry Services, EMS Division.

Expected Earnings

Earnings for EMTs depend on the employment setting and geographic location as well as the individual's training and experience. The average salary for an EMT is $27,000-$29,000, and increases when based with a hospital or fire service.

Curriculum

Associate Degree

Code

Emergency Medical Services, AAS

0276

Certificate

Code

Gainful Employment

Basic Emergency Med Services, CA

0269

Listing for 0269

Basic Emergency Medical Tech, CC

1018


Gainful Employment Home

Course Offerings

Many of the courses listed below are offered at LCC throughout the academic year and can be taken to upgrade current skills or fulfill degree and certificate requirements. Visit the Course Offerings page for information pertaining to courses available during a particular semester and to view course descriptions.

View Course Descriptions - Emergency Medical Services Seminars (EMSB)

View Course Descriptions - Emergency Medical Services (EMSA)

View Course Descriptions - Emergency Medical Technology (EMTA)

Related Information/Links

Physical Guidelines

Students must be able to do

  1. STRENGTH. Perform physical activities requiring ability to push/pull objects more than 50 pounds and to transfer objects of more than 100 pounds.
  2. MANUAL DEXTERITY. Perform motor skills such as standing, walking, writing; manipulative skills requiring eye-hand coordination and arm-hand steadiness, taking blood pressure, and using various types of large and small equipment.
  3. COORDINATION. Perform body coordination such as walking, running, climbing stairs, retrieving equipment and moving patients from the floor/bed/chair to a cot.
  4. MOBILITY. Physical abilities to maneuver in small spaces (ambulance) and treatment areas. Ability to walk, stand, kneel, stoop, and to be in prolonged uncomfortable positions.
  5. VISUAL ABILITY. See objects far away, see objects close and to discriminate colors. Visual ability must be sufficient for driving an ambulance and for observation and assessment necessary in patient care. Students will perform such skills as detecting a patient's color, checking pupils, and reading medication labels.
  6. HEARING. Be able to hear normal sounds with background noise and distinguish sounds sufficient to monitor and assess health needs. Necessary activities include hearing monitor alarms, emergency signals, listening to breath sounds, and hearing radio transmissions.
  7. CONCENTRATION. Concentrate on details with moderate amount of interruptions.
  8. ATTENTION SPAN. Attend to task/functions for periods up to 60 minutes in length and to attend to task/functions for periods exceeding 60 minutes in length.
  9. CONCEPTUALIZATION. Understand and relate to specific ideas, concepts, and theories generated and simultaneously discussed.
  10. MEMORY. Remember task/assignments over both short and long periods of time and recall theory and skills information in clinical and simulation situations throughout the program.
  11. CRITICAL THINKING. Apply the theory taught in lecture courses in simulations and clinicals. Ability must be sufficient for clinical judgment in patient care.
  12. INTERPERSONAL. Interact with individuals, families, and groups from a variety of social, emotional, cultural, and intellectual backgrounds. Must be able to establish rapport with patients, colleagues, faculty, and professional staff.
  13. SUBSTANCE ABUSE. No evidence of current alcohol or drug abuse.

Environmental Conditions

As an EMS student you will be exposed to a variety of substances within the work environment, hospital sites, and ambulance agencies. You can expect exposure to weather changes, blood, body tissues, and fluids. There is the potential of exposure to electrical hazards, hazardous waste materials, radiation, poisonous substances, chemicals, and loud or unpleasant noises. Weekly clinical rotations and the ambulance internship result in frequent exposure to high stress emergency situations.

Students will be required to complete a mandatory on-line OSHA Blood-Borne Pathogen and Universal Precautions program.

Links

Occupational Outlook Handbook
United States Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/

Michigan Association of EMTs
412 W Ottawa
Lansing MI 48933-1518
http://www.maemt.org

National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians
408 Monroe St
Clinton MS 39056
http://www.naemt.org

Michigan Department of Community Health
http://www.michigan.gov/mdch/0,1607,7-132-2946_5093_28508-132259--,00.html

National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians
PO Box 29233
Columbus OH 43229
http://www.nremt.or

National Highway Transportation Safety Administration
EMS Division
400 7th St SW NTS-14
Washington DC
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/ems/agenda/toc.html

Scholarships

Occupational Program Awards - Deadline for 2014 Scholarship Applications is Friday - January 31, 2014.

The awards are offered for a maximum of three semesters over a period of two consecutive years (Fall, Spring and one Summer Semester.) Renewal each semester is contingent upon the recipient meeting all award requirements. The Awards will cover up to $1,096 in tuition and fees each fall and spring semester and up to $382 for an optional summer semester. These amounts will cover approximately 12 billing hours plus partial fees in Fall and Spring Semesters and 4 billing hours plus partial fees in Summer Semester. An award recipient must:

  • Be a citizen or permanent resident of the U.S.
  • Reside in the LCC district.
  • Be a high school graduate.
  • Pursue an approved LCC Health or Human Services Degree (occupational curriculum).
  • Have a cumulative high school grade point average of at least 3.0

For more information, please contact:
Occupational Program Awards Coordinator at (517) 483-1210.

Basic Emergency Medical Technician Program at Lansing Community College

Emergency Medical Services
Health and Human Services Bldg, Room 108
Phone: (517) 483-1410
Additional contact information »